ILLINOIS

 

French explorers Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. Marquette soon after founded a mission at the Grand Village of the Illinois in Illinois Country. In 1680, French explorers under René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle and Henri de Tonti constructed a fort at the site of present-day Peoria, and in 1682, a fort atop Starved Rock in today’s Starved Rock State Park. French Empire Canadiens came south to settle particularly along the Mississippi River, and Illinois was part of first New France and then of La Louisiane until 1763, when it passed to the British with their defeat of France in the Seven Years’ War

The British Crown made the region of Illinois part of the territory reserved for Indians west of the Appalachians, and then part of the British Province of Quebec. In 1778, George Rogers Clark claimed Illinois County for Virginia. In a compromise, Virginia ceded the area to the new United States in 1783 and it became part of the Northwest Territory, to be administered by the federal government and later organized as states. Connecticut ceded northern Illinois in 1786 (see Connecticut Western Reserve).

In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. Abraham Lincoln, succeeded in having the capital moved to Springfieldwhere a fifth capitol building was constructed.

In 1832, the Black Hawk War was fought in Illinois and current-day Wisconsin between the United States and the SaukFox (Meskwaki) and Kickapoo Indian tribes. It represents the end of Indian resistance to white settlement in the Chicago region.