FORT TEJON


This military post was established by the United States Army on June 24, 1854, to suppress stock rustling and protect the Indians in the San Joaquin Valley. Camels for transportation were introduced here in 1858. As regimental headquarters of the First Dragoons, Fort Tejón was an important military, social, and political center – it was abandoned September 11, 1864. 

Designation:
National Historic site (71000140)
State Historic Park
• State Historical Site (129)
Visited: 01/17/2015
LocationMap
Website: N/A



CAMELS OF FORT TEJON
Location: Map

See: Grave of George Caralambo (#646)

In 1856 the U.S. Army started an experiment using camel for supply transport in the southwest. The camels proved ill suited to the American southwest. In November 1859 a civilian contractor turned over 28 camels to the Army at Fort Tejon. The post quartermaster cared for the camel herd until 1861 when the heard was transferred to the Los Angeles Depot. With the possible exception of an unsuccessful messenger service in September 1860, the camels were never used in military operations. The “Camel Corps” mentioned in many writing never existed.


PETER LEBECK
Location: Map

Killed by a bear October 17, 1837. In memory of a pioneer of whom only conjecture can speak.