MISSION SANTA BARBARA


Santa Barbara Mission was founded December 4, 1786. Portions of five units of its extensive waterworks, built by Indian labor and preserved in this part, are a filter house, Spanish gristmill, sections of aqueducts, and two reservoirs, the larger of which, built in 1806, is used today as part of the city water system. The fountain and lavadero are nearby, in front of the mission, and a dam built in 1807 is located in the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, one and one-half miles up Mission Canyon. Only ruins remain of the mission’s pottery kiln, guard house, and tanning vats.

Designation:
• National Historic Site (66000237)
• State Historical Site (309)
Visited: 07/29/2015
LocationMap
Websitewww.santabarbaramission.org



GRAVE OF JUANA MARIA
LocationMap

Juana Maria (died October 19, 1853), better known to history as the Lone Woman of San Nicolas Island, was a Native American woman who was the last surviving member of her tribe, the Nicoleño. She lived alone on San Nicolas Island off the coast of California from 1835 until her rescue in 1853. Scott O’Dell’s award-winning children’s novel Island of the Blue Dolphins (1960) was inspired by her story. She was the last native speaker of the Nicoleño language.


SANTA BARBARA MISSION RESEVOIR
LocationMap
Websitewww.sbbg.org

Constructed in 1806-1807 by Chumash Indian neophytes under the direction of the Franciscan padres, this historic dam and aqueduct system helped supply the Santa Barbara Mission with a reliable source of water. Although no longer a functioning dam, the structure has been preserved by the Botanic Garden and can be viewed from above and below.